Neurology

Neuro-cognitive performances of very preterm or very low birth weight adults at 26 years

This study concluded that the neuro-cognitive difficulties that the adults born prematurely were experiencing continued into adult life despite additional educational support in childhood. Click to see the abstract.

Madzwamuse, S.E, Baumann, N., Jaekel, J., Bartmann, P., Wolke, D. (2014) Neuro-cognitive performances of very preterm or very low birth weight adults at 26 years. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiarty. 56:8 p857-864

Autonomic nervous system development and its impact on neuropsychiatric outcome

This paper highlights that stress around the time of birth, including prematurity, may cause the autonomic nervous system (ANS) to undergo ‘dysmaturation’. During early childhood development, connections are formed between the ANS and the limbic system in the brain which influence our psychological and physiological responses. Therefore the Polyvagal Theory describes how changes within the ANS and vagal tone can have an impact upon social responses and neuropsychiatric disorders. Click here to read the article.


Mulkey, S., du Plessis, A., (2018) Autonomic nervous system development and its impact on neuropsychiatric outcome. Pediatric Research, 85(120-126)

Increased Brain Age Gap Estimate (BrainAGE) in Young Adults After Premature Birth

This study follow preemies up to the age of 26 years and utilised an abbreviated version of the German Wechsler Adults Intelligence Scalehas. They concluded that their results demonstrate elevated BrainAGE in premature-born adults, suggesting an increased risk for accelerated brain ageing in human prematurity. Click here to read the article.


Hedderich, D., Menegaux, A., et al. (2021) Increased Brain Age Gap Estimate (BrainAGE) in Young Adults After Premature Birth. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience

Adult outcome of preterm birth: Implications for neurodevelopmental theories of psychosis

In this paper the team have evaluated the implications of neurodevelopmental, cognitive, motor, and social sequelae of preterm birth for developing psychosis, with an emphasis on outcomes observed in adulthood. They have found that abnormal brain development precipitated by early exposure to the extra-uterine environment, and exacerbated by neuroinflammation, neonatal brain injury, and genetic vulnerability, can result in alterations of brain structure and function persisting into adulthood. Click here to read the article.


Vanes, L., Murray, R., and Nosarti, C. (2021) Adult outcome of preterm birth: Implications for neurodevelopmental theories of psychosis. Schizophrenia Research